Wednesday Workshop – The Balancing Act – How to Balance Family, Work and Caregiving

Wednesday Workshop – The Balancing Act – How to Balance Family, Work and Caregiving

Wednesday Workshop – The Balancing Act – How to Balance Family, Work and CaregivingWednesday Workshop – The Balancing Act – How to Balance Family, Work and Caregiving

If you’re currently caring for a loved one, chances are you often feel overwhelmed by the difficulty of balancing your responsibilities to your loved ones, your home, and your job. You’re not alone.

Here’s how to ease the burden:

Talk to your supervisor. Take some time to think about your company’s policies and what changes would help you better manage your responsibilities. Be upfront about your role as a caregiver and the demands that it puts on you. It’s better that she or he hear from you why you’re coming in late or seem preoccupied. Spell out the concrete steps you can take to juggle your competing demands.

Ask for help. Plan for times when you need help by making a list of people who are willing to lend a hand. This list might include family members, friends, and temporary care workers. On your list, include phone numbers, the times people are available and the tasks they feel most comfortable doing. Keep a copy of the list with you at all times in case you’re away from home when you need to ask someone for help.

Don’t abuse work time. Whenever possible, avoid taking care of caregiving chores when you should be working. If you have to make phone calls or search the Internet for information related to your parent’s needs, do it on your lunch break.

Stay organized. Do your best to manage your time efficiently. Use to-do lists and calendar reminders. Set priorities, then tackle the most important items first. Delegate at work and at home.

A dedicated calendar. A calendar specifically for keeping track of appointments, entertainment and other engagements concerning your loved one can be helpful. It’s all about what works best for you.

Reduce clutter. Yes, I know that seems impossible when we look at the medical paperwork that stuffs our mailboxes and all the extra equipment our loved ones need. However, some type of organization early on can save frustration in the event of an emergency, during tax time or simply when making a call to the physician’s office. You don’t need a sophisticated system – just one that makes sense to you.

Back up relief. You may or may not have anyone who can relieve you on a regular basis, but you definitely need to have backup help for emergencies. Whether that means that you complete paperwork ahead of time with an in-home care agency and perhaps use their services a few hours a month to stay on their radar, or you have a neighbor you can call, you need someone who can take over for you if you become temporarily incapacitated.

To contact us here at the Alzheimer’s Care Resource Center

Please call us at (561) 588-4545. Thanks for watching today’s Wednesday Workshop and we’ll see you again next week!