Wednesday Workshop – Family Caregiving – Maintaining Balance in the Family

Wednesday Workshop – Family Caregiving – Maintaining Balance in the Family

Wednesday Workshop – Family Caregiving – Maintaining Balance in the FamilyWednesday Workshop – Family Caregiving –
Maintaining Balance in the Family

As a family caregiver, you may find yourself facing a host of new responsibilities, many of which are unfamiliar or intimidating. At times, you may feel overwhelmed and alone.

But despite its challenges, caregiving can also be rewarding. And there are a lot of things you can do to make the caregiving process easier for both you and your loved one. These tips can help you get the support you need while caring for someone you love.

Even if you’re the primary family caregiver, you can’t do everything on your own, especially if you’re caregiving from a distance. You’ll need help from friends, siblings, and other family members, as well as health professionals. If you don’t get the support you need, you’ll quickly burn out—which will compromise your ability to provide care.

But before you can ask for help, you need to have a clear understanding of your family member’s needs. Take some time to list all the caregiving tasks required, being as specific as possible. Then determine which activities you are able to meet but be realistic about your capabilities and time. The remaining tasks on the list are ones you’ll need to ask others to help you with.

It’s not always easy to ask for help, even when you desperately need it. Maybe you’re afraid to impose on others or worried that your request will be resented or rejected. But if you simply make your needs known, you may be pleasantly surprised by the willingness of others to pitch in. Many times, friends and family members want to help, but don’t know how.

Here’s how to make it easier for them:

  • Set aside one-on-one time to talk to the person
  • Go over the list of caregiving needs you previously drew up
  • Point out areas in which they might be of service (maybe your brother is good at Internet research, or your friend is a financial whiz)
  • Ask the person if they’d like to help, and if so, in what way
  • Make sure the person understands what would be most helpful to both you and the caregiving recipient

To Contact Us

To learn more or to contact us here at the Alzheimer’s Care Resource Center please call (561) 588-4545. Thanks for watching today’s Wednesday Workshop and we’ll see you again next week!