Waves of Faith – The Five Finger Prayer

Waves of Faith – The Five Finger Prayer

Waves of Faith – The Five Finger Prayer This five finger prayer is a good way to pray. It also leads all people to pray for things outside our limited view. 1. The thumb is the closest finger to you. So start praying for those who are closest to you. They are the persons easiest to remember. To pray for our dear one is a “sweet obligation.” 2. The next finger is the index. Pray for those who teach you, instruct and heal you. They need the support and wisdom to show direction to others. Always keep them in your prayers. 3. The following finger is the tallest. It reminds us of our leaders, the governors and those who have authority. They need divine guidance. 4. The fourth finger is the ring finger. Even that it may surprise you, it is our weakest finger. It should remind us to pray for the weakest, the sick or those plagued by problems. They need your prayers. 5. And finally we have our smallest finger, the smallest of all. Your pinkie should remind you to pray for yourself! When you are done praying for the other four group, you will be able to see your own needs but in the proper perspective, and also you will be able to pray for your own needs in a better way. To speak with us here at the Alzheimer’s Care Resource Center, feel free to call us at (877) 760-9199. Thanks for watching today’s Waves of Faith and we’ll see you again next...
Wednesday Workshop – 20 Lessons Learned from Alzheimer’s Caregivers

Wednesday Workshop – 20 Lessons Learned from Alzheimer’s Caregivers

Wednesday Workshop – 20 Lessons Learned from Alzheimer’s Caregivers Hello and welcome to Wednesday Workshop. We are taught important life lessons every day, but the most memorable seem to come from those we love the most. Alzheimers.net asked the caregivers on Facebook what some of the most important lessons learned from loved ones with Alzheimer’s were. This is what some of them shared: 1. That you need to make time to sit with your loved one and have a cup of tea and a conversation, even if limited. All these things become precious memories. I would give anything to have another precious moment with my Mom. –Marcia D. 2. Not to disagree with them. If your 88-year-old mother says her mom is alive and she just talked with her on the phone, agree and let it go. Try to have more patience. Yes, they are going to ask the same questions over and over. Expect that and roll with the punches. –Mary L. 3. My mother used to tell me that her mother came to visit, and that they went to the apple orchard and picked apples, and then went to get a malt. I would just say, “That sounds wonderful. I hope you had a nice day with your mother.” She would reply, “Oh, yes, we had a lovely day.” Who cares that it didn’t really happen? If it made her happy, great! –Dani P. 4. To love unconditionally, that’s what my Mom taught me. Even though she sometimes had no clue who I was, she never stopped loving me. It was an honor to be her daughter...
Monday Mojo for Caregivers – Habits of a Healthy Caregiver

Monday Mojo for Caregivers – Habits of a Healthy Caregiver

Monday Mojo for Caregivers – Habits of a Healthy Caregiver Hello and welcome to Monday Mojo for Caregivers. Caregivers instinctively put a senior’s comfort and happiness above their own. But both are equally important. If caregivers sacrifice their own happiness for the sake of their job, they won’t be any good to the seniors they serve. Here are some habits that happy caregivers practice to ensure their health and wellness remains a priority. 1. Nurture your mind and body. Caregivers must replenish themselves physically and mentally. 2. Keep an eye on your health. According to Nurture Your Soul™, 70% of caregivers become sick with some type of health issue. And 50% of caregivers die before the person to whom they’re providing care. 3. Find support. Take time each week to vent to friends or family members. It’s healthy. Some caregivers might even consider joining a support group or seeing a counselor they can rely on to help sort out frustrations. 4. Eat healthy. A nutritious diet keeps energy levels up and health risks at bay. Seniors need to eat healthy too. So caregivers might think of preparing low-fat meals and snacks that incorporate a variety of fruits and vegetables, and enjoying them with the senior, as a part of the job. 5. Exercise. Staying active physically helps reduce stress and improve mood. It’s the ideal way to ward off health issues and diseases that can put a caregiver’s job at risk. 6. Meditate. Consider activities that help you relax mentally. Yoga, meditation, deep breathing and music are just some of the ways to help a caregiver slow down and...
Wednesday Workshop – Memory Boosting Superfoods that Boost Brain Power

Wednesday Workshop – Memory Boosting Superfoods that Boost Brain Power

Wednesday Workshop – Memory Boosting Superfoods that Boost Brain Power Hello and welcome to Wednesday Workshop. Our brains are complex and powerful machines that require lots of nutrients to function properly. They regulate thousands of complex functions, which is why it’s so important to care for your brain each day. Check out the list of superfoods to eat to boost your brain power and improve your mental performance. Vegetables especially leafy greens like spinach, kale, turnip greens and broccoli, have been strongly linked to lower levels of cognitive decline in older age, according to a study in the Annals of Neurology. Salmon and other cold-water fish such as halibut, tuna, mackerel and sardines, are rich in omega-3 fatty acids. Other omega-3 sources include beans, some nuts, flax seeds and healthy oils, like olive oil. Berries and dark-skinned fruits are rich in antioxidants. According to the Alzheimer’s Association, some of the fruits that pack the most punch are blueberries, blackberries, strawberries, raspberries, plums, oranges, red grapes and cherries. Coffee and chocolate are surprisingly good for you. Recent studies have shown that caffeine and coffee can be used as therapeutics against Alzheimer’s disease. The caffeine and antioxidants in these two tasty treats may help ward off age-related memory impairment, along with cinnamon, olive oil and curry. Extra virgin olive oil contains a substance that helps boost the production of key proteins and enzymes that help break down the plaques associated with Alzheimer’s disease. Cold-pressed virgin coconut oil is a heart-healthy oil that is free of cholesterol and trans-fats. Coconut oil has been shown to improve the body’s use of insulin, increase...
Monday Mojo for Caregivers – Life Hacks for Caregivers

Monday Mojo for Caregivers – Life Hacks for Caregivers

Monday Mojo for Caregivers – Life Hacks for Caregivers Hello and welcome to Monday Mojo for Caregivers. A “life hack” is a popular term used to describe a tool or method that makes your daily life easier to get through. We all want to find ways to minimize the moments of stress that present themselves, but this is particularly true for caregivers. With that in mind, here are a couple things that can simplify your day as a caregiver: Around the House Hacks If your loved one is prone to wandering or is consistently seeking to find an exit, consider painting a mural on the door. To help ease the anxiety, hire an artist to paint the doors with calming images that make your loved one feel more at home. To keep certain doors open, cut a pool noodle in half and fit it high up on the door. That way, your loved one can’t lock themselves in a room or close their fingers in a door. Drill a pencil size hole straight through a tennis ball for your loved one to easily write, sign or paint on paper. The wide grip and shape help make it comfortable for the senior to hold the pen and write. For bath time, put a bar of soap in an old stocking (panty hose). You can use the soap through the stocking to bathe your loved one and when you accidently “drop” it, the soap is still within reach, not on the floor. When there is down time, help your loved one with the television remote control by covering unneccessary/extra buttons with tape or...
The Reef for Male Caregivers – Are You Stressed or Depressed & How to Tell the Difference

The Reef for Male Caregivers – Are You Stressed or Depressed & How to Tell the Difference

The Reef for Male Caregivers – Are You Stressed or Depressed & How to Tell the Difference Hello and welcome. If you are feeling overwhelmed by stress, you are not alone; it’s practically a fact of life in caregiving. Stress is good if it motivates you but it’s bad if it wears you down. Many factors can contribute to the stress you experience, and this stress can cause changes in your body that affect your overall physical, mental, and emotional health. Depression is more serious and long-lasting than stress, and requires a different kind of help. The good news is that depression is a highly treatable condition. However, it’s not something you can snap out of by yourself, so it’s important to get help. How do you tell the difference between stress and depression? Both can affect you in similar ways, but there are key differences. Symptoms of depression can be much more intense. Depression causes powerful mood changes, such as painful sadness and despair. You may feel exhausted and unable to act. Here are common signs of stress and depression:  Common Signs of Stress  Common Signs of Depression  Trouble sleeping  Withdraw from other people  Feeling overwhelmed  Feeling sad and hopeless  Problems with memory  Lack of energy, enthusiasm & motivation  Problems concentrating  Trouble making decisions Change in eating habits Being restless, agitated and irritable Feeling nervous or anxious Eating more or less that usual Feeling angry, irritable or easily frustrated Sleeping more or less than usual  Feeling burnt out  Trouble concentrating Feeling that you can’t overcome difficulties Trouble with memory Trouble functioning while at work Feeling bad about yourself...
Wednesday Workshop – Why Alzheimer’s is Called the Family Disease

Wednesday Workshop – Why Alzheimer’s is Called the Family Disease

Wednesday Workshop – Why Alzheimer’s is Called the Family Disease Hello and welcome to Wednesday Workshop. Alzheimer’s disease can run its course from 2 to 20 years and turn a fully functioning adult or senior citizen into a helpless individual. In many ways, the effects of Alzheimer’s disease on the family can be as devastating as its effects on the patient. “Alzheimer’s disease is often called a family disease, because the chronic stress of watching a loved one slowly decline affects everyone,” reports The Family Caregiver Alliance. The Early Stages Receiving the diagnosis is traumatic for the entire family. The early effects of Alzheimer’s on the family consist of processing the diagnosis, learning about the disease and preparing for the future. Individuals with Alzheimer’s may begin to say things and act in ways that are offensive and hurtful towards others. A soft spoken woman may become violent. A timid man may become reckless. In this stage, family members are learning to differentiate between the disease and their loved one. The Middle Stages As the disease progresses, and the patient loses touch with reality, the strain on family members, especially those providing care, becomes greater. It’s not uncommon for caregivers to suffer from grief and loss as the person they are caring for changes. During this stage, safety also becomes a critical issue. Families should consider day care or in-home care options to help with daily tasks. The Late Stages If a family chooses to keep the patient at home for the duration of his life, the later stages of the disease require extensive care. Patients must be fed, moved, cleaned...
Monday Mojo for Caregivers – 5 Ways to Relax and Find Peace

Monday Mojo for Caregivers – 5 Ways to Relax and Find Peace

Monday Mojo for Caregivers – 5 Ways to Relax and Find Peace Hello and welcome to Monday Mojo for Caregivers. One of the common challenges for caregivers is finding time to rest, relax and recharge. Taking the time to make yourself a priority, even for 30 minutes a day, can have a positive impact on your health, mind and spirit. The problem is that while many caregivers are aware that they need to make a change to take care of themselves; they don’t really know to do it. It’s really hard to break routine. Here are 5 ways to relax and find peace to consider: Meditation – The beauty of meditation is that anyone can do it, anywhere, anytime. It delivers a sense of calm and peace, making it an excellent stress and tension reliever. Whether you can spare 10 minutes or 30 at the beginning or end of your day; meditation can help ease tension and allow you to gain a new perspective on a stressful situation Morning and Evening Stretch – Begin and end your day with some gentle stretching to relax and release tired muscles, improve circulation and range of motion. Just a few minutes each morning and evening can make an impact on your day. Tai Chi – Tai Chi involves a series of slow, graceful movements accompanied by gentle deep breathing. Some describe Tai Chi as “meditation in motion.” It’s an excellent, low-impact exercise that reduces stress and anxiety while getting your energy flowing. Yoga – With a focus on the synchronization of movement and breath, yoga builds strength, stamina, balance and flexibility. It...
Wednesday Workshop – 6 Ways to Arrange a Break from Caregiving

Wednesday Workshop – 6 Ways to Arrange a Break from Caregiving

Wednesday Workshop – 6 Ways to Arrange a Break from Caregiving Hello and welcome to Wednesday Workshop. Options for respite care range from informal agreements with friends and neighbors to formal contracts for services with an agency or onsite at a facility. Here are six ways to arrange a break from caregiving: 1. Ask for Help from Family and Friends. When you sincerely ask a friend or family member for help, they will usually say yes and that means you get to take a well-deserved break! When approaching potential helpers, be specific about what’s required – and get a solid commitment about the days and times they’re available. This type of care is almost always free but it’s a good idea to either pay a small amount or to compensate family or friends informally with gas station or restaurant gift cards. 2. Try Companion Care. A companion can prepare meals, do light housekeeping, help with laundry, shop for groceries, run errands and, most importantly, offer friendship to your loved one when you can’t be there. Companion care can range from free services provided by local volunteers to $10.00 per hour for help arranged through an agency depending on the type of care needed and the time of day. 3. Hire a professional caregiver. In addition to providing light housekeeping and homemaking tasks – professional caregivers can help patients with bathing, dressing, toileting, and grooming. They can’t provide medical services, such as diabetes care, but they can help administer prescribed medications. Costs range from $15 to $40 per hour for intermittent help; $120 to $200 per day or more for live-in...
Monday Mojo for Caregivers – Being Fully Present While Caregiving

Monday Mojo for Caregivers – Being Fully Present While Caregiving

Monday Mojo for Caregivers – Being Fully Present While Caregiving Hello and welcome to Monday Mojo for Caregivers. Mindfulness, in its most basic sense, is the art of being fully aware and in the present moment in the absence of judgment. Typically, this is opposite of a caregiver managing multiple tasks, often for more than one household. Mindfulness allows for the full experience of life as it is happens. This may seem impossible for a busy caregiver. However, the reward for even five minutes of mindfulness between you and your loved one is one for the memory books. Caregivers have a very long list of tasks including: pay bills, do laundry, change bed sheets, wash and comb hair, drive to appointments, and pick up prescriptions. While the goal may be to accomplish as many tasks as possible in the shortest amount of time, the true goal is to maintain, even improve, the quality of life for our loved one. In truth, 3-5 minutes of just being engaged and present in the moment with our loved one is more precious, rewarding, and healing than a clean house. There are many ways to engage in mindfulness. Here are three ways to incorporate mindfulness into a busy caregiving routine: 1. After changing the bed sheets with fresh linen, sit or lay with or next to your loved one. With soft music, or in silence, remark how fresh the linens smell, how nice they feel, and how nice it is to share this moment with him or her. 2. While in the waiting room, practice mindfulness together. Notice all the colors in the...